Nanoblur, FreezeFrame & Frown Fix. Can any of them really rid me of my wrinkles?

This week I’ve be testing out three anti-ageing products each promising, in their own unique way, to tun back the clock without you having to resort to Botox – something I’ve tried but am no fan of (see this old post for my views on that).

I’ve got to be honest, it hasn’t been a trial that’s over-impressed me. To be fair, the products I tried have certainly got their work cut out with my craggy, 40-something mush, especially as my face is testament to my general theatricality (I’m very much a stranger to the natural wrinkle-buster known as ‘Behavioural Botox’). But anyway, here’s how I got on with them. I’m not saying they will or won’t work for you, just how they performed on me. 

FreezeFrame, £49 for 50ml from Boots.  Seemingly this became the No 1 selling anti-ageing product in Australia in its first week. This does nothing to make me think well of our Australian pals, who I can only assume have much lower expectations than us Brits when it comes to wrinkle-busters.

In a similar way to products like Eyesential, it’s great for temporarily erasing wrinkles and would be brilliant just before having a family photo taken perhaps but not so great if you actually want to engage your facial muscles because all the wrinkles simply re-appear the moment you do. It contains a litany of muscle relaxants, face-freezers and wrinkle-relaxing octapeptides ( pentapeptides being terribly old hat) but alas, it still couldn’t cope with my fine lines and furrows. Don’t, whatever you do, use too much of the stuff either – it dries on your face like, well, I won’t say – but let’s just say you’ll look like The Singing Detective if you overdo it.

IP+ FAB FROWN FIXm £10.25 for 4ml from Boots I can’t tell you how excited I was about trying this. Looking back at old photos of myself recently I realised that I’ve been scowling almost since I left the womb. I don’t quite know what I was expecting, given the depth of my frown lines, but whatever it was I didn’t get it from this filler. Apparently celebrity fans include Sarah Harding, Victoria Beckham and the girl from last year’s X-Factor who did that thing with her hand. I can only assume these people have even lower expectation than the Australians.

Nanoblur, £19.99 for 30ml from Boots. The last of the trio of products I’ve been trying, this is also by far the best. Unlike the others it doesn’t relax muscles or fill out wrinkles – it simply cheats the eye into thinking your skin looks better than it actually is. Based on advanced optics technology (it contains millions of light reflecting particles) it evens out skin tone, minimises fine lines and gives skin a nice matt finish. Light diffusing technology isn’t anything new but this product seems to take things to a new level. And guess what? It actually works.

So I did actually find something to wrestle with the wrinkles in the end. I wouldn’t go as far as to say I’m ready for High Definition yet but, hey, it’s a start.

The Grooming Guru’s Top 5 Autumnal Fragrances

I was going to compile my Top 5 fragrances for Autumn for a blogpost on here but since Men’s Health pipped me to the post and asked me to compile a list for them I thought I may as well simply share the link with you. So to discover why I think Dsqared’s Potion is magical and Roja Dove’s Danger Pour Homme is positively pornographic simply click here!

TSAR by Van Cleef & Arpels – a blast from the guru’s past


My love affair with fragrance began in the mid eighties and by the end of the decade I was hooked. Having a partner who, at the time, sold them as a Saturday job (in a department store not out of a suitcase I hasten to add) helped, of course, because it meant I got an endless supply of dinky samples to try. And so began my love affair with the smelly stuff.

Years on, I’m having much fun re-discovering the fragrances I remember from my youth (and reliving the memories they bring). TSAR by Van Cleef & Arpels is one fragrance I’m amazed I actually wore back then though. Smelling it now, this ballsy fougere is way too grown up a fragrance for a 21-year-old.

It’s strength and boldness really is something to behold. In fact, spraying it is a bit like landing a punch. As a fragrance it’s warm, slightly soapy, a bit leathery and incredibly spicy. This comes, in part, from a pungent pepper note, one that I suspect wasn’t quite so ubiquitous in 1989, when the fragrance launched, as it is now. The base notes – moss, leather and patchouli – give it a distinctly trad flavour which is why I’m more inclined to recommend it for older guys.

If anything, though, it offers a fascinating insight into how fragrance companies saw men in the 1980s. Like a lot of things in that much-maligned decade TSAR it’s decidedly over-blown, bombastic and in-your-face – the giant shoulder pad of men’s fragrances if you like.